December 11, 2019 3 min read

The wolf has always been looked up as a creature of beauty and enigma and is therefore worthy of respect and curiosity. Based on the social organization, both of us live based on strong family ties. We pick our packs’ members who have the strong ability to care for our families. And rituals build relationships, maintain order, and enforce discipline in both wolves and man. However, wolves are still in the wild and man has moved away, but some of us are still searching for what we once had. Today, we will continue the curious year in the life of a wolf. If you’re not caught up, please check “A Year in the Life of a Wolf: Part I and II” here at wolvestuff.com/blogs

September

To wolf pups, the first fall into winter is a critical time. They have to learn how to hunt and fend for themselves because some of them will be driven away from the jurisdiction of the pack by the alpha pair once a new litter is born in spring. Children are old enough to fly several miles wandering every night in search of food at around half the size of adults. Just watching at first, the young wolves learn which animals to attack, how the pack works together in a chase, and how to kill running prey, all the important lessons they will evoke in the years to come. Adolescent wolves in the litter of the year are now traveling on hunts with the pack. They only watch the adults hunting tactics and killing at first, but they will soon join the action.

October

Wolves are preferred to hunt at night, feeding mostly on large mammals such as moose deer and caribou. Hunting as a pack, wolves are trying to surprise prey, cut off or ambush their retreat. In average, only 1 in 10 checked animals, usually the elderly, young, sick or wounded, will be killed. When wolves can wound their prey to the exposed rump or hamstring with a crushing bite, the pack can pounce on their quarry and finish the kill with 2-inch-long fangs and an impressive 1,500 pounds of jaw strength per square inch. Wolves can run at speeds of up to 35 mph, but if a kill is unlikely or a formidable prey puts up a strong defense, they will quickly abandon a chase.

November

To some, a wolf's howl is creepy, sad, or chilling at the heart. To others, it's the plains ' magnificent, untamed record. This serves a number of purposes for wolves. Howling is sometimes used to express place during hunting. Once leaders are removed from the group, other vocalizations are used. Also, a package will hurry to communicate territory. Each wolf in the chorus is going to hurl on a different note, making the group look bigger than it really is. After a successful hunt, chorus howling is also heard. Besides sending messages, howling reinforces pack unity, which can explain why wolves sometimes seem to hurl for no other reason than their joy. A wolf separated from his pack may emit a "lonesome howl." When answered, the wolf changes to a "site" howl that is louder, more even and often punctuated with barks.

December

To some, a wolf's howl is creepy, sad, or chilling at the heart. To others, it's the plains ' magnificent, untamed music. This serves a number of purposes for wolves. Howling is sometimes used to express place during hunting. Once leaders are removed from the group, other vocalizations are used. Also, a package will hurry to communicate territory. Each wolf in the chorus is going to hurl on a different note, making the group look bigger than it really is. After a successful hunt, chorus howling is also heard. Besides sending messages, howling reinforces pack unity, which can explain why wolves sometimes seem to hurl for no other reason than their joy. A wolf separated from his pack may emit a "lonesome howl." When answered, the wolf changes to a "site" howl that is louder, more even and often punctuated with barks. Although it seems to be harsh, it is sometimes necessary to ostracize young people if the pack is to survive on the territory's limited prey. It is one of many ways to maintain the balance of nature. Many wolves reaching 22 months of sexual maturity can leave the pack to set up a new territory, find a mate, and start a new pack.

This concludes our Year in The Life Series. Wolves are beautiful, aren’t they? Without them, the circle of life will be derailed, here at Wolvestuff, we support the cause to save the wolves worldwide, help us and let’s make the world a better place.

 

Written by James Miranda


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