April 17, 2019 3 min read 1 Comment

Do you consider yourself living with a wolf? Well, for a starter, having a wolf running in your backyard with your children is not the best idea there is.

If you are a big fan of the hit T.V. series Game of Thrones and see yourself having a wolf beside you all day and night, let me tell you this " You know nothing, Jon Snow" .

On the other hand, a hybrid between a wolf and a dog is being breed on some parts of the U.S. and honestly fascinating.  With these in mind, let us dig deeper into Wolfdogs and the considerations of having one.

Ever since the early people learned to live off land, animals were there. They helped people in their daily lives. Early people learned how to domesticate early breed of dogs to help them for hunting. These early breed of dogs were clearly distinguished from wolves as per the early fossils recorded. But what is a Wolfdog exactly?

 ‘’ Wolf dogs are crossbred dogs, with one parent being a dog and the other a wolf. While sometimes referred to as hybrids, wolfs and dogs are all members of the same Canis species. Dogs are classified as a subspecies of wolves, Canis lupus familiaris, which is why it is possible for dogs and wolves to crossbreed. ‘’ according to The Spruce Pets.  
Wolfdogs can be described better than pets as companions. They are smarter than most "domestic" dog breeds, are self - conscious, aware of their surroundings, challenge with their stubbornness and "what's in it for me" attitude even the most experienced caretakers, and are generally the most predictable canine as wolves are the model of canine behavior and wolfdogs tend to display emotions very well.

It's both understandable and surprising that people want to take home a bit of that wildness in the form of a wolf / dog mix  or "wolfdog " which some consider to be the best of both worlds: the friendly companionship of a dog coupled with the good looks of a wolf and untamed nature.

Reality, like many things, isn't that simple. Wolfdogs may be the most misunderstood animals in America and, many would argue, mismanaged. Advocates say they can be beautiful pets, while opponents argue that they are unpredictable, untrainable and dangerous inherently.

They are allowed in some places, prohibited in others, and appear on breed ban lists together with Pitbulls and other so called "dangerous breeds."
Wolfdog owners are encouraged to vaccinate their animals, but they must make a hard choice to do so: lie to their veterinarian about the lineage of the animal or sign a waiver stating that they understand that the vaccine is being used "off - label" on a hybrid animal and can therefore not be relied on to provide full protection against rabies, and that their animal can be impounded and put down if it bites someone,  a high - stakes gamble, and one that the wolfdog can pay for with his life.

Legally or unlawfully, wolfdogs pose significant behavioral challenges for owners, many of whom are unable or unwilling to meet them, creating a large population of unwanted animals chained, abandoned or euthanized in backyards.
With these in mind, we have to responsible for the welfare of these beautiful creatures. We have to consider the lifestyle we’re getting into before plunging in the thought of having a wolfdog.  I can’t stress enough the importance of research before diving in or end up unfortunate outcome for our families or for the wolfdogs.
 
 
 
Sources:
www.thebark.com
floridalupine.org
www.dogbreedinfo.com

1 Response

lubos rusnak
lubos rusnak

May 06, 2019

hi im now the CZechoslovakien wolfdog, is yours is the mix german shepard wit karpatien wolf?

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